Question: Why Villains Are Better Than Heroes?

Are villains more interesting than heroes?

Yeah, villains have a tendency to be far more interesting than the hero, not just in fantasy books but in most types of fiction with good guys and bad guys.

A lot of writers seem have a lot more fun and use a lot more imagination when it comes to writing for their vilians than writing for their heroes..

Why do I always like villains?

A few other reasons why people like the villains is because villains are unpredictable. If it was a hero, it would be expected for the hero to do the right thing. People hold heroes in a certain light. … And I feel like some people like villains just because villains make them feel good about themselves.

Why are villains evil?

Perhaps they began as a good guy who was corrupted by greed. Maybe their dark side can be explained by a fear of losing their loved ones. Whatever their reason for doing evil deeds, your villains and antiheroes’ character motivations should be rooted in a relatable desire or emotion.

How can I become truly evil?

To be truly evil, someone must have sought to do harm by planning to commit some morally wrong action with no prompting from others (whether this person successfully executes his or her plan is beside the point).

Why are villains important?

The Importance of Villains. Villains are an important component in any work of literature. Without the villain, we wouldn’t see how good the hero is; we wouldn’t understand the dangers and conflict a community or person is facing, and we wouldn’t have someone to hate and blame for all the problems.

Are villains smarter than heroes?

Most of the time, villains are smarter than heroes. When they lose, it’s often due to some moral failing like being too cynical, not believing in the power of love, having no friends and only depending on themselves, etc.

Can villains be heroes?

Even monsters, like the shark in Jaws or the velociraptors of Jurassic Park, can be heroes of their own story. … In Aliens, the Queen is defending her brood. Once we understand that, the conflict is even stronger.

Why do I always feel bad for the bad guy?

We watch bad guys with far more emotion From the University of Southern California comes a study that says the human brain feels more empathy for villains than people we actually like. … The human brain has a “pain matrix” that is made up of the insula cortex, anterior cingulate and somatosensory cortices.

What villain means?

a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or crime; scoundrel. a character in a play, novel, or the like, who constitutes an important evil agency in the plot.

Why are villains more attractive?

“I think that a lot of the time, people will see the ‘bad guy’ as attractive because it’s exciting and because it instills fear.” In fact, fear plays a large role in nonsexual arousal. It causes a rush of chemicals that we typically associate with attraction — adrenaline, endorphins and dopamine.

What makes a bad villain?

A villain is someone who comes into direct conflict with your protagonist. The two are on a collision course. What makes the villain “bad” is that he’s opposing your protagonist. But it’s also important to note that a villain does not view himself as a villain.

Who is the No 1 villain?

VillainsRankVillainFilm1Hannibal LecterThe Silence of the Lambs2Norman BatesPsycho3Darth VaderStar Wars4The Wicked Witch of the WestThe Wizard of Oz25 more rows

Why being the villain is better?

Unlike super heroes, the villain is only hunted with the motivation of putting them in prison instead of actually killing them. The dangers are less severe. You don’t have to juggle college, work and personal commitments with using your powers. Everything works around you.

Are villains always evil?

Yes and no. Some villains are just truly evil, while many want to accomplish a task that seems right to them but not to others. … He is truly evil. So, in short, some villains are terrifyingly evil while others try to achieve something that seems morally correct to them but not to us.

Why do we cheer for the bad guy?

We’re rooting for every man who lies and cheats because they all have a character flaw that, when we analyze ourselves, we can see as a weakness in ourselves too. … We allow the character to do illegal things because they give a reason for why they are breaking the law and we agree.

Does every story need an antagonist?

While your fiction doesn’t have to include an antagonist, it must have a series of compelling and persuasive obstacles that the main character must negotiate.